Adult Learning Provision 2020-2021 Project Brief


1. Purpose and Objectives of Adult Learning


1.1 Funding

The Leeds Adult Learning Provision for 2020/21 is being delivered with funding from the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA).

1.2 Funding Models

Under the Adult Education Budget (AEB), AEB provision currently includes funding model 10 Community Learning (non-regulated) and funding model 35 Adult Skills (regulated). Non-regulated provision must follow the Recognising and Recording Progress and Achievement (RARPA) process outlined in Learning and Works Institute guidance. The provision is subject to Ofsted inspection; the standards are outlined in the Ofsted Education Inspection Framework (EIF).

1.3 Purpose

The purpose of Adult Learning is to develop the skills, confidence, motivation and resilience of adults of different ages and backgrounds in order to:

  • Improve health and well-being, and/or reducing social isolation
  • Progress towards formal learning and/or work readiness, jobs and volunteering
  • Develop stronger communities.

1.4 Objectives

The objectives of the programme are to:

  • Focus public funding on people who are marginalised and least likely to participate, including unemployed adults, people on low incomes, those with low skills and those who may not have achieved their potential in previous learning experiences.
  • Challenge disadvantage through participation in learning.
  • Widen participation and transform people’s life chances by supporting progression relevant to personal circumstances.
  • Engage those from the most deprived neighbourhoods.
  • Engage those target groups underrepresented in Adult Learning.
  • Develop stronger communities, with more self-sufficient, connected and pro-active citizens.
  • Create circumstances for people to be able to improve their social and economic wellbeing
  • Support delivery by a range of providers including the voluntary, adult, and statutory and specialist sectors.
  • Collect fee income from people who can afford to pay.
  • Support delivery based in local settings

1.5 Programme Overview

The Leeds Adult Learning Provision for 2020/21 seeks to achieve these aims and objectives through the delivery of provision under the following programmes:

  • Personal and Community Development Learning (PCDL) is learning for personal and community development, cultural enrichment, to acquire a new skill or to pursue an interest, demonstrating social impact on the learners. These courses will additionally focus on health and wellbeing, improving confidence, reducing social isolation, creating active citizens and enhancing community cohesion and capacity. In most cases, there would be no formal qualification outcome attached to learning.
  • Family English, Maths and Language (FEML) is provision designed for parents (or other carers of children) with English and Maths needs or is for families where English is not the primary language. Often these courses are linked to schools or Children’s Centres. Programmes will aim to: o Improve parent /carers confidence and ability to support their child’s learning o Increase confidence and involvement in school activities for parents/carers o Raise aspirations of parents/carers and children o Breakdown the intergenerational cycle of under achievement and poverty o Improve literacy / numeracy / wellbeing for parents, carers and children
  • Wider Family Learning (WFL) provision is designed to support different generations of family members to learn together. It has the aims of:
    o Developing the skills and knowledge of the parent/carer and child participants alongside each other.
    o Enabling parents/carers to be more active in the support of their children’s learning and development and to understand the impact of that support.
  • Skills for Life and Work (SfLW) is aimed at adults aged 19 and over, with low skills levels, who are not currently working or in regular employment but want to progress to further learning, employment or volunteering. Activities must deliver tailored, individual support, integrated with other services/opportunities where possible. Programmes should help realise the potential of learners and develop their confidence to take advantage of work and learning opportunities. These courses will aim to close the digital divide and/or improve English, maths and communication skills. A key element of Skills for Life and Work is ensuring progression to employment, volunteering or further learning.
  • Targeted Learning Projects (TLP) is provision for learners with multiple and/or complex needs who require more intensive support.
  • Adult Skills (ASB) is accredited provision funded according to ESFA Adult Education Budget funding model 35 for the following levels:
    o Entry Levels o Level 1
    o Level 2 Full details of the activity required under each programme can be found in the specifications in Section 2 of this document.

1.6 The Best Council Plan

The aims and objectives of the Leeds Adult Learning provision both reflect and contribute to the delivery of the Best Council Plan. The plan sets out the long term ambition and aspirations for the city. Leeds aims to be the best city by:

  • Tackling poverty, helping everyone benefit from the economy to their full potential
  • Reducing health inequalities and supporting active lifestyles
  • Improving the city's transport and digital infrastructure and tackling climate change risks
  • Making Leeds the best city for children and young people to grow up in
  • Making Leeds the best city to grow old in
  • Improving the quality of lives and growing the economy through cultural and creative activities
  • Providing homes of the right quality, type and affordability in the right places and minimising homelessness
  • Keeping people safe from harm and prioritising community respect and resilience

The Best Council Plan can be found here.

1.7 Adult Learning in Localities

Leeds City Council will seek to prioritise the following:

  • Provision delivered in neighbourhoods that fall into the most deprived 1% nationally in the wards of Armley; Beeston and Holbeck; Burmantofts and Richmond Hill; Hunslet and Riverside; Chapel Allerton; Gipton and Harehills; Little London and Woodhouse; Middleton Park; Killingbeck and Seacroft
  • Provision delivered specifically meeting the needs of people living in the priority neighbourhoods of Holdsforth, Clyde Approach; Stratfords, Beverleys; Crosby Street, Recreations, Bartons; Boggart Hill; Clifton, Nowells; Lincoln Green - see Appendix 1
  • English and Maths.
  • Programmes that support digital inclusion and digital skills development.
  • Programmes that support work readiness and/or volunteering.
  • English as a second or other language (ESOL). See Appendix 6.
  • Programmes that support learners experiencing/recovering from mild to moderate mental health issues.

1.8 Leeds Adult Learning Trust Board

Leeds Adult Learning Trust Board (ALTB) is a partnership body, set up in 2012 to influence strategic priorities through the delivery of quality Adult Learning for the city. It includes some of the city’s key stakeholders from the third sector, Further and Higher Education, Health, Children’s and Adult Services.

This Board set out the Leeds City Council’s Adult Learning Plan 2016-20/21 – see Appendix 2.


2. Specification for Adult Learning Provision

Providers may bid to deliver activity from one or more of the following programmes:

  • Personal and Community Development Learning (PCDL) – see 2.1
  • Family English, Maths and Language (FEML) – see 2.2
  • Wider Family Learning (WFL) – see 2.3
  • Skills for Life and Work (SfLW) – see 2.4
  • Targeted Learning Projects (TLP) – see 2.5
  • Adult Skills (ASB) – see 2.6

The requirements below apply to all programmes. Requirements specific to individual programmes are detailed in sections 2.1 to 2.6.

Please note 2020/21 contracts can only be awarded to single organisations. Providers who are awarded contracts are not permitted to sub-contract any element of the activities to a third party, including individuals.

Minimum Organisational Standards

The following standards are a minimum requirement for organisations proposing to deliver provision in Leeds:

  • All teaching staff will hold a teaching/training qualification (Education and Training Award – level 3 or equivalent) or will be working towards this within the term they commence delivery and complete within twelve months in addition to an appropriate subject specific qualification or industry/sector experience.
  • All teaching staff will hold L2 qualifications in English and maths or be willing to work towards them within agreed timescales.
  • All staff will have undertaken appropriate Safeguarding training and access refresher training on a maximum of a 3 year cycle.
  • All staff will have undertaken training on the Prevent Duty appropriate to their role and access refresher training on a maximum of a 3 year cycle.
  • All teaching staff will participate in CPD to keep up to date with their specialist subject and pedagogy relating to teaching, learning and assessment practices.
  • Providers will be able to ensure access to digital platforms to support learning – such as Google Classrooms. Leeds City Council can provide access to Google Classroom if needed
  • Providers will pay Living Wage and this will be a factor in scoring if otherwise two tenders are the same.
  • Providers will follow Safer Recruitment and inclusive recruitment practices when employing staff.
  • All relevant staff will hold a current DBS certificate.


Geographical Priorities: Applicable to All Programmes

Priority will be given to activity focused on engaging with and supporting learners:

  • Living in the most disadvantaged 20% of Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs), nationally. (As identified in the 2019 Areas of Multiple Deprivation and detailed in Appendix 1)
  • Living in deprived areas where existing Adult Learning opportunities and progression options are limited.
  • Living in those neighbourhoods where the population has been identified as having low levels of skills.


Minimum Learner Numbers

  • A minimum of ten learners must be enrolled on each course before the course start date; and
  • A minimum of eight learners must attend each course session; and
  • Where learner attendance falls below eight over three consecutive sessions, or the course starts with fewer than ten enrolments Leeds City Council (LCC) must be informed and the course should be closed, unless otherwise agreed in writing with LCC.


Learner Fees

  • All providers must comply with the Learner Fees Policy set out in Appendix 3.
  • The policy explains whether a learner should pay the full fee, a reduced fee or is fee exempt. The policy also explains how to calculate the total fee amount.


Cross Cutting Themes: Applicable to all programmes

The following themes must be embedded within programme delivery:

  • Widening Participation – especially of marginalised and priority groups, with strategies and activity to increase reach and integration and a focus on community capacity and active citizenship. This should include partnership working where possible to facilitate information sharing regarding opportunities, support mechanisms, referrals and access to IAG.
  • Progression Pathways – supporting and facilitating progression relevant to personal circumstance, which improves the learner journey. This should include partnership working, where possible, to facilitate information sharing regarding opportunities, support mechanisms, referrals and access to IAG.
  • Equality and Diversity – the staffing profile, teaching, training and assessment should reflect and promote equality and diversity. All commissioned providers will be required to attract target groups, including those underrepresented in Adult Learning.
  • British Values – provision promotes British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.
  • English and Maths, ICT, Personal, Social and Employability Skills – teaching, learning and assessment must make the development of these skills explicit as part of delivery and SfLW courses should also include bespoke initial assessments.
  • Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance – all programmes should provide access to appropriate, timely and impartial information, advice and guidance to ensure learners are on the right course, to inspire and raise awareness of all progression opportunities. Providers will be required to submit destination data as part of the ILR contract requirements and provide progression information as required.
  • E-learning and Digital Inclusion – integrated learning technology is used effectively to promote and support learning and the capacity of learners to engage with information technology is embedded within programme delivery. Programmes will actively aim to reduce the digital divide and increase learner participation with on line resources to enhance learning.
  • Education for Sustainable Development – learners develop skills, knowledge and understanding relevant to sustainable personal development and ensuring they can utilise their talents to take up economic and educational opportunities.
  • Education for Improving Health and Wellbeing – learners develop skills, knowledge and understanding that improves the quality of their health and wellbeing, helps improve lifestyle choices and appropriate assessment is of distance travelled is incorporated into teaching and learning.


Provider Payments/Tariff Rate: Applicable to all Programmes

  • Activity delivered under programmes 2.1 to 2.5 will be remunerated in accordance with the tariffs set out in Appendix 4.
  • Activity delivered under programme 2.6 will be remunerated according to the weightings and rates defined by the ESFA and the Learning Aims Reference Service


Strategic Priorities: Applicable to all Programmes

Providers should ensure that all provision is aligned with the strategic objectives and outcomes set out in the Best Council Plan, and those determined by the Leeds Adult Learning Trust Board, as described in Section 1.

Funding must not be claimed for any part of the learning programme that duplicates provision received from any other source.

Delivery must meet funding rules set out in Adult Education Budget: Funding Rules. Draft rules for 20/21 have been published by the ESFA but most up to date rules at time of delivery must be followed.


2.1 Personal and Community Development Learning (PCDL)

Funds Available: circa £400,000
Target number of Learners: 2,200

Eligible Activity

The PCDL provision will support learning which is for personal and community development, cultural enrichment, learning to acquire a new skill or pursue an interest and increasing social capital of learners. These courses will additionally focus on physical and mental wellbeing, improving confidence, reducing social isolation, creating active citizens and enhancing community capacity.

All PCDL courses should embed development of English, Maths and digital skills as appropriate within the context of the subject and the needs of the learners and use agreed initial assessment tools.

LCC is seeking to support a broad and balanced range of activities that engage disadvantaged and socially isolated learners or others at risk of social exclusion.

The learning does not have to be attached to a formal qualification and can be at any level, e.g. pre-entry, entry, level 1, level 2, etc. PCDL provision can support activities delivered in response to identified local need and/or learning which is for personal development and enjoyment or to maintain skills and contribute to the learners’ overall health and well-being. For example, confidence building, healthy eating, creative crafts etc. Such provision must adhere to the stages of RARPA and focus on learning.

The PCDL provision should encourage learner progression (in its widest sense) and providers should have effective systems in place to signpost learners to further learning or other opportunities as appropriate.

PCDL taster courses must be a minimum of six guided learning hours.

Eligible Learners

Adults living in the Leeds Metropolitan District aged 19 and over by 31st August of the academic year (25 and over for LLDD learners).

Priority Learner Groups

  • Those not in employment and/or in receipt of benefits.
  • Those with low skill levels.
  • Those with no qualifications.
  • Disadvantaged groups or individuals with specific needs e.g. lone parents, care leavers, BME groups, adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities, people in recovery.

Priority Activity

We are particularly interested in funding the following provision:

  • Activity which develops health and well-being.
  • Activity at Entry Level and Level 1.
  • Activity that promotes social inclusion and widens participation SSAs that can be funded under this strand of activity will be set out in the Provider Handbook.

2.2 Family English, Maths and Language (FEML)

Funds Available: circa £123,000
Target number of learners: 400

Eligible Activity

All FEML programmes will be designed to help parents/carers* and their children improve English, Maths and Language skills, separately and together.

Programmes are defined as learning ‘as or within a family’. With the exception of Keeping up with the Children all courses must include opportunities for inter-generational learning and, wherever possible, lead both adults and children to pursue further learning.

LCC is seeking to offer a broad and balanced range of Early Years Foundation Stage, Primary KS1 and KS2 provision with a balance of English, Maths and Language in targeted venues across the city.

Programmes should ideally be co-delivered with partners in schools and Children’s Centres to ensure relevant children’s curriculum support is utilised (additional funding to support partner organisations will be paid directly to the school or children’s centre).

FEML programmes should aim to:

  • Improve parent /carers’ confidence and ability to support their child’s learning
  • Increase confidence and involvement in school activities for parents/carers
  • Raise aspirations of the parents/carers and children
  • Breakdown the intergenerational cycle of under achievement and poverty
  • Improve literacy/numeracy/wellbeing for parents/carers and children

All courses should demonstrate English, Maths or Language outcomes and include initial assessment of English and/or Maths needs using agreed appropriate assessment tools.

Courses of 20 hours or more could offer, where applicable, accreditation and Standard Programmes (up to 72hrs) could offer unitised English, Maths or ESOL qualifications at the appropriate level.

All courses should demonstrate clear links to one or more outcomes set out in LCC’s Children and Young People’s Plan – see Appendix 8 - and must demonstrate how these outcomes will be met. These are:

  • Children and young people are safe from harm.
  • Children and young people do well at all levels of learning and have the skills for life.
  • Children and young people choose healthy lifestyles.
  • Children and young people have fun growing up.
  • Children and young people are active citizens who feel they have a voice and influence.

*To be consistent with terminology, adults on family programmes (FEML and WFL) will be referred to as parents/ carers. It is assumed that this includes mothers, fathers, carers, grandparents – whoever has a key caring role for the child.

Eligible Learners

Adults aged 19 and over by 31st August of the academic year (25 and over for LLDD learners) living in the Leeds Metropolitan District (MD). In some cases younger parents /carers may be eligible with prior written approval. Exceptions apply to:

  • Learners who live outside this area whose children attend schools within Leeds MD

Priority Learner Groups

  • Adults with no qualifications.
  • Families at risk.
  • Those not in employment and/or in receipt of benefits.
  • Those identified by schools and children’s centres who would benefit from family programme interventions.
  • Disadvantaged groups or individuals with specific needs e.g. lone parents, care leavers, BME groups, children at risk of poverty.
  • Fathers/male carers who are currently underrepresented in Family Learning.

Priority Activity

English and Maths remains a national priority and LCC wishes to increase the volume of family English and Maths courses through this commission.

In order to achieve a balanced curriculum we are seeking to fund the following courses:

  • 7 Introductory courses.
  • 18 Short (English or Maths) courses.
  • 8 Standard Maths courses.
  • 8 Standard English or ESOL courses.

2.3 Wider Family Learning (WFL)

Funds Available: circa £60,000
Target number of learners: circa 240

Eligible Activity

Wider Family Learning is a planned programme of activity designed to engage the adult and child together over a period of time. All WFL should have processes in place to signpost learners to Family English, Maths and Language (FEML) or other suitable learning.

Programmes may be offered across a range of curriculum areas but demonstrate clear links to one or more outcomes set out in LCC’s Children and Young People’s Plan. See Appendix 8.

These are:

  • Children and young people are safe from harm.
  • Children and young people do well at all levels of learning and have the skills for life.
  • Children and young people choose healthy lifestyles.
  • Children and young people have fun growing up.
  • Children and young people are active citizens who feel they have a voice and influence

All WFL courses should

  • Embed development of English, maths and digital skills as appropriate within the context of the subject and the needs of the students.
  • Include a commitment to and a system for signposting a learner to English, Maths, ESOL, FEML or other suitable programmes and be linked to progression opportunities.
  • Include learning specific to the subject area (e.g. science, football, healthy eating, dance, money management etc.)
  • Include practical examples for parents/or carers* of how to support their child.
  • Develop the skills and knowledge of both the adult and child participants.
  • Encourage parents/carers to be more active in the support of their children’s learning and development and to understand the impact of that support
  • Raise the attainment and/or achievement of adults.
  • Promote learning for the whole family.
  • Build the confidence and attachment of family members of all ages as they join together in a learning activity.
  • Promote positive family relationships

*To be consistent with terminology, adults on family programmes (FEML and WFL) will be referred to as parents/ carers. It is assumed that this includes mothers, fathers, carers, grandparents – whoever has a key caring role for the child.

Eligible Learners

Adults aged 19 and over by 31st August of the academic year (25 and over for LLDD learners) living in the Leeds Metropolitan District (MD). In some cases younger parents /carers may be eligible with prior written approval. Exceptions apply to:

  • Learners who live outside this area whose children attend schools within Leeds MD

Priority Learner Groups

  • Adults with no qualifications.
  • Families at risk.
  • Those not in employment and/or in receipt of benefits.
  • Disadvantaged groups or individuals with specific needs e.g. lone parents, BME groups, adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities, children at risk of poverty.
  • Fathers/male carers who are currently underrepresented in Wider Family Learning

Priority Activity

In 2020/21, LCC will prioritise activities in the following areas:

  • Family Financial Capability which focuses on support for those affected by changes to welfare services and regulations. Courses such as money management and cooking on a budget will be prioritised.
  • Family Health provision which promotes good family health and wellbeing by offering opportunities related to healthy eating, healthy exercise and positive mental health. These activities should embed key principles from the Best Council Plan and the priorities within the Children and Young People’s Plan.
  • Family Digital Skills programmes which support the developments and technological advances taking place in schools.
  • Family Science programmes which support the Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) agenda in schools to enthuse and inspire parents/ carers and their children about all aspects of science, maths and the environment.

2.4 Skills for Life and Work

Funds Available: circa £720,00
Target number of learners: circa 4,000

Eligible Activity

The aim of Skills for Life and Work provision is to link learning to employment opportunities in the city, by raising the skill levels and confidence of learners, to improve their chances of gaining sustained employment.

Activity must provide defined progression routes to employment, volunteering and/or continued learning such as further education, other employability support or apprenticeships. To this end, partnership working with local organisations and agencies to develop pathways for both learner recruitment and progression is vital. All students should have access to high quality IAG to ensure they are aware of all options to aid progress and how they can access them.

All delivery should be tailored to the needs of the individuals and specific client groups.

All delivery must include agreed English / ESOL / Maths initial assessment and include specific development of these skills in all courses.

With the exception of the ESOL Curriculum provision must be a minimum of ten guided learning hours. ESOL curriculum modules should meet the prescribed minimum module guided learning hours.

Examples of eligible activity are given below. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list and other activity will be considered:

  • On line application skills development - equipping learners with the skills and confidence to compete in employers’ on line recruitment processes.
  • Confidence for employability courses. Courses should explore learners’ strengths, skills and talents within a work context, identify transferable skills and explore routes into further learning, volunteering or paid work.
  • Courses that promote and develop volunteering skills and opportunities.
  • ESOL - providing an opportunity for those developing their language skills – including reading and writing.
  • English and Maths – providing an opportunity for those developing their literacy and numeracy skills.
  • Financial wellbeing – courses that help with money management, accessing financial services and manging money online.
  • Tasters in key skill areas and employment sectors.
  • Programmes that support digital inclusion and digital skills development.

Eligible Learners

Adults living in the Leeds Metropolitan District aged 19 and over by 31st August of the academic year (25 and over for LLDD learners).

Learners must be looking for work or seeking an opportunity to improve their future career prospects.

Priority Learner Groups

  • Those not in employment and/or in receipt of benefits and those on low incomes.
  • Those with no qualifications and/or low skill levels.
  • Disadvantaged groups or individuals with specific needs e.g. lone parents, BME groups, people in recovery.
  • Programmes supporting individuals/families affected by changes to welfare benefits.

Priority Activity

  • Provision that includes skills analysis; confidence building; making a winning impression; presentation skills; what employers look for; employment opportunities in Leeds; individual support and signposting.
  • Digital Inclusion programmes that may support training on how to apply for jobs online, writing CVs and covering letters etc.
  • Activity which supports learners improving their essential skills including English, Maths and ESOL.
  • Activity with clear progression routes to volunteering, employment or further learning.

SSAs that can be funded under this strand of activity will be set out in the Provider Handbook.

2.5 Targeted Learning Projects

Funds Available: circa £250,000
Target number of learners: circa 600

Eligible Activity

This specification will support the delivery of the following types of learning projects:

  • Projects where all learners have multiple and/or complex needs which substantially disadvantage them compared to other learners e.g. substance misusers; people who are homeless, offenders released from prison, people in recovery, etc. It is recognised that these learners may require more intensive support from specialist providers. Activities in this specification could include one to one support and/or development hours as an engagement strategy. Therefore, activities in this specification will include the following elements
    o Development hours to recruit difficult to engage learners, provide additional support maintain attendance on the programme
  • Projects which include overnight residential. Activities should enhance standard Adult Learning delivery and enable learners to achieve their primary learning goal through a bespoke residential programme. This element of the learning may include:
    o Working with others.
    o Working as part of a team.
    o Problem solving and resilience.
    o Decision making.
    o Vocational tasters.
    o Maths and English
  • Projects targeting learners experiencing mild to moderate mental health issues which substantially disadvantage them compared to other learners. This funding will help learners as part of their recovery from/management of common mental health issues, including depression, anxiety and sleep disorders. It is recognised that these learners may require more intensive support than available through the standard Adult Learning guided learning hour tariff rate. Therefore, activities in this specification will include the following elements:
    o Staff training to undertake Mental Health First Aid programme and other relevant programmes.
    o Development hours to provide additional support to learners to establish or maintain learners on the programme.

The Council is seeking to support a number of projects under Targeted Learning Projects to ensure a broad and balanced programme of activities which meet the needs of the priority learner groups.

Please note provision must be a minimum of six guided learning hours.

Eligible Learners

  • Adults living in the Leeds Metropolitan District aged 19 and over (25 and over for LDD learners).

Priority Learner Groups

Projects where all learners have multiple and/or complex needs which substantially disadvantage them compared to other learners. This may include:

  • Disadvantaged groups or individuals with specific needs e.g. lone parents, BME groups.
  • Those who are hard to reach, people with chaotic lifestyles, multiple needs or experiencing other significant barriers to learning.
  • Substance misusers or those in recovery
  • Learners experiencing mental ill health, including depression, anxiety and sleep disorders.
  • Those with experience of the criminal justice system
  • Men who are traditionally underrepresented in Adult Learning
  • Those not in employment and/or in receipt of benefits.
  • Those with low skill levels

ESOL programmes will only be funded under this strand if programmes actively link to employment opportunities and will be agreed at contract stage.

Priority Activity

We are particularly interested in funding the following provision:

  • Innovative learning opportunities that address the specific needs of the target groups.
  • Activity which develops confidence/employability skills.
  • Activity with clear progression routes to further learning, volunteering and/or employment.

2.6 Adult Skills (ASB) Entry, Level 1, Level 2

Funds Available: circa £40,000
Target number of learners: circa 100

Eligible Activity

The Council is seeking to support accredited Entry Level, Level 1 and Level 2 provision with a recognised qualification to widen opportunities for learners to become employed or progress to higher levels of learning.

Before starting learners on a qualification, appointed providers must make sure that the qualification is eligible for ESFA Adult Education Budget funding. The Council is seeking to fund full awards at entry/level 1/level 2 and/or a unitised programme for unemployed learners.

ESFA fundable qualifications can be checked on the Learning Aims Reference Service (LARS).

Provision must support activities delivered in response to identified local needs in the Best Council Plan 2015-20. Funded Adult Learning activity should fall within one or more of the following Council objectives:

  • Tackling poverty, helping everyone benefit from the economy to their full potential
  • Making Leeds the best city for children and young people to grow up in
  • Improving the quality of lives and growing the economy through cultural and creative activities.

The provision should encourage learner progression and providers must have effective systems in place to signpost learners to further accredited learning and/or employment/career opportunities as appropriate.

All courses must be at least the minimum recommended guided learning hours to attain the qualification. Course completion and attainment of qualifications form part of the ESFA final funding payment conditions.

Eligible Learners

Adults living in the Leeds Metropolitan District aged 19 and over by 31st August of the academic year (25 and over for LDD learners).

Priority Learner Groups

  • Those not in employment and/or in receipt of benefits.
  • Those with low skill levels.
  • Those with no qualifications.
  • Disadvantaged groups or individuals with specific needs e.g. lone parents, BME groups, adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities.
  • Those who wish to improve their employment and/or further learning opportunities.

Priority Activity

We are particularly interested in funding the following provision:

  • Activity which develops employability/confidence skills.
  • Activity at Entry/Level 1/Level 2 defined in LARS.
  • Activity with clear progression routes to further learning and/or employment.

Please be aware that students cannot be funded again for a qualification they have already passed. Some qualifications have age restrictions attached to funding and these should be fully investigated before enrolling.

2.7 Digital Skills Curriculum Development

Funds Available: circa £20,000
Target number of learners: circa 80

Eligible Activity

The Council is seeking to support the piloting and further development of a curriculum in digital skills aimed at linking with new essential skills digital standards as well as providing a clear progression pathway for learners to further extend and develop their digital skills.

The aim of the curriculum is to support the demand for a skilled workforce in the growing digital sector by engaging with ‘new’ tech and associated employment opportunities and encourage under-represented groups to engage with the sector.

We will fund providers to pilot the LCC digital framework that has been developed to enhance the 5 digital standards:

  • Using devices and handling information.
  • Creating and editing.
  • Communicating.
  • Transacting.
  • Being safe and responsible online.

Further development of the curriculum must be modular (with a minimum of twenty guided learning hours per module) and be a mix of classroom delivery and extended study supported by on-line interactive materials. Delivery will also include clear partnership working to support learners into further learning and/or employment or volunteering. The curriculum modules must empower and challenge learners to embrace technology and to play an active role in our shared digital future by providing an opportunity to learn new tech skills such as website and App design Blogging/Vlogging etc. to improve their day to day use of technology and support new employment and career ambitions.

Courses will be paid at the standard GLH rates subject to minimum learner numbers being recruited and will include funding for tutors to complete on line training including the use of Google Classroom as the on line delivery platform, if they have not already done so, and complete course evaluations and develop resources. Payment will be for:

  • Piloting courses using standard GLH rates and procedures in Skills for Life and Work funding stream guidelines (but separate to this funding).
  • Developing on line interactive support for modules to support extended study.
  • Agreed module development time at a rate of £15 per hour, supported by documentary evidence (timesheets, materials produced etc.) with total hours agreed at contract stage.
  • Mandatory tutor attendance at scheduled review meetings paid at £25.00 per meeting.
  • Tutor CPD to be agreed based on tutor skills analysis, development need and intervention required .

Course delivery to take place from September 2020.

Eligible Learners

Adults living in the Leeds Metropolitan District aged 19 and over by 31st August of the academic year (25 and over for LDD learners).

Priority Learner Groups

  • Those not in employment and/or in receipt of benefits.
  • Those with low skill levels.
  • Those with no qualifications.
  • Disadvantaged groups or individuals with specific needs e.g. lone parents, BME groups, adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities.
  • Those who wish to improve their employment and/or further learning opportunities.
  • Underrepresented groups in the digital sector

3. Contractual Requirements

3.1 Compliance

Contracted providers will be required to comply with all reporting and monitoring requirements as set out in their contract, which includes both Leeds City Council’s Terms and Conditions and the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) Terms and Conditions.

All providers will be set the following Key Performance Indicators:

  • retention and achievement
  • overall learner numbers
  • new learners
  • recruitment from underrepresented groups
  • percentage of learners from the 20% most deprived LSOAs
  • completion and submission of key data as set out in the Monitoring Timetable
  • meeting required standards for delivery of education
  • actively engaging in quality improvement activities at individual and organisational level

Targets will be written into the provider contract. Failure to achieve the targets will be considered as a breach of contract and could result in funding being withheld or withdrawn.

3.2 Monitoring

Providers will be monitored for effective engagement/recruitment of target learners including those underrepresented in adult learning, pace of learner recruitment and delivery, learner satisfaction levels and responsiveness to RARPA (Recognising and Recording Progress and Achievement), Quality Improvement Review (QIR) feedback, document audits and quality of progression information given to learners. Progress will be monitored through the Individual Learning Record (ILR), monitoring meetings and quality cycle activities.

All contracted providers will be required to meet Ofsted standards and undertake an annual Self-Assessment, in line with guidance published by Ofsted, Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and the Council. The Self-Assessment report should be submitted to the Council in 2021 at a date to be agreed.

All contracted providers will be required to ensure that all activities take place in a safe, healthy and supportive environment which meets the needs of learners and is compliant with Ofsted and ESFA’s guidance on safeguarding.

A Quality Improvement Review (QIR) /inspection visit may be undertaken by the Council, the ESFA and/or Ofsted at any time. Funding may be withdrawn if it is found that the quality of provision is below standard or that required evidence is inadequate, and the provider is unable to address this. As part of QIR or inspection organisations must be able to provide documents relating to Safer Recruitment, inclusive recruitment and evidence of staff development.

In line with ESFA terms and conditions, all records relating to the performance of the contract must be retained until 31 December 2031.

3.3 Payment

Providers will be paid on a tariff basis for activity including piloting and developing the Digital Curriculum in in Specifications 2.1 to 2.4 as set out in Appendix 4. Providers delivering a Targeted Learning Project through specification 2.5 will be remunerated in accordance with the payment terms described at 2.5. Providers delivering Adult Skills programmes will be remunerated in accordance with the payment terms described at 2.6.

Payment will be based on actual submission of accurate completed course documentation entered on the council management information system (MIS) Maytas, including learner enrolment, course register and intended destination data.

Only provision which meets the requirements as set out in the relevant sections of the ESFA’s Funding Rules 2020/21 will be funded.

Please note the ESFA’s Funding Rules are subject to change and providers will be required to comply with the ESFA’s most current rules at all times.

Please also note the following conditions of commissioning:

  • Funding relates to the 2020/21 academic year only.
  • All activity must be completed by 31st July 2021.
  • Providers must adhere to the Learner Fees Policy in Appendix 3.
  • The use of sub-contractors (including individuals) is not permitted.
  • Minimum of ten learners to be enrolled on courses and where learner attendance falls below eight learners for three or more consecutive course sessions, course activities will not be funded unless there is prior written approval from the Council.

3.4 Terms and Conditions

The Terms and Conditions included with the order form are subject to receipt of the ESFA’s final Terms and Conditions. These will be re-issued at the contract stage.

In the event of a contractor ceasing trading or pulling out of agreed activity part way through their service provision, Leeds City Council reserve the right to re-allocate that provision and remaining funds by carrying out a secondary call for competition under the contract framework (arrangement).


4.0 Management Systems

4.1 Maytas Management System

All data related to the delivery of learning including course details, learner details, enrolment and attendance must be entered onto the Council’s Maytas Management Information System by the Provider in line with published timescales.

The project management systems of contracted providers will be subject to robust monitoring, course document audit and fees audit checks to ensure that the conditions of funding are fully met in relation to expenditure through the Council’s Adult Learning Budget from the Education and Skills Funding Agency.

4.2 Contract Delivery and Monitoring Meetings

Contracted providers will be required to deliver against an agreed contract except as otherwise agreed with the Council in writing. If the Provider is unable to meet the agreed delivery as specified within the Contract, then notification is required in writing to LCC Employment and Skills team at the earliest opportunity.

The Provider Handbook 2020/21 contains further information on documentation and procedures that must be strictly adhered to. Failure to adhere to these could affect funding. The Provider Handbook 2020/21 will be made available via the Digital Platform for Adult Learning and/or Google Classroom to contracted providers on return of the signed contracts.

Contracted providers will be required to attend Performance Monitoring Meetings – usually once per term. Providers will be required to supply evidence which will support contract performance. Evidence requirements will be confirmed in advance of the meetings.

Monitoring meetings will be conducted by staff in the Council’s Employment and Skills Service and/or other nominated representatives. Monitoring meetings will typically assess:

  • Progress against targets – including retention, attendance, recruitment and learner profile.
  • Financial spend and claim against contract values.
  • Timeliness and accuracy of ILR data submissions.
  • Feedback on quality issues and progress against actions.
  • Progress against providers’ Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) and QIR reviews.

4.3 Other Quality Assurance Methods

In addition to the termly monitoring meetings, Leeds City Council will ensure quality provision through the following:

  • Class Visits to assess quality of teaching, learning and assessment to ensure Ofsted EIF requirements are met. This will also include allowing access to learning supplied via digital platforms. Providers and tutors will be required to carry out any recommended actions and to evidence these in Quality Improvement Plans (QIPs) and CPD records. In addition, providers will be required to submit copies of internal observation of teaching, learning and assessment reports.
  • Quality Improvement Reviews (QIR) which will include, but not be limited to activities such as:
    o Class Visits and Learning Walks to assess the quality of teaching, learning and assessment
    o Meetings with learners to talk about their learning experiences
    o File checks to ensure the effectiveness of implementing the 5 stages of RARPA within programmes; quality of planning, embedding English and Maths, learner work scrutiny and quality of information, advice and guidance
  • Conducting Learner Satisfaction Surveys to ensure courses are meeting the needs and interests of learners.
  • Document Audits to ensure the effectiveness of implementing the 5 stages of RARPA within the learner’s programme; embedding English and Maths, learner work scrutiny and quality and consistency of planning. Providers will also be required to submit copies of any internal reports in these areas.
  • Policy and Procedure Monitoring to ensure provider policies and procedures remain relevant and up to date. All listed up to date policies must be submitted at the time of bidding.
  • Data Collection to ensure that learner destination and progression are being captured and recorded effectively

In order to ensure Ofsted EIF and LCC quality requirements are met the above is not an exhaustive list of quality improvement activity and it may be amended at any time in order to ensure provision continues to meet all regulatory standards.

Providers will be required to carry out any recommended actions and to evidence these in Quality Improvement Plans (QIPs), monitoring meetings and completion and submission of CPD records as documented in the Monitoring Timetable. In addition, providers will be required to submit copies of internal observation of teaching, learning and assessment reports. Providers will also participate in quality assurance activities to ensure quality of RARPA, feedback on learner work and quality of planning including embedding of English and Maths.

Quality Improvement Review (QIR) visits will be undertaken by the Council. Please note quality assurance visits may take place without prior warning. Also the ESFA and/or Ofsted may perform audit/inspection visits at their discretion and timing.


Appendix 1: Priority Geographical Areas

Adult Learning activity should focus on engaging with and supporting learners:

  • Living in the most deprived neighbourhoods in Leeds i.e. in the 20% most deprived Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs) nationally.
  • Living in those neighbourhoods where the population has been identified as having low levels of skills. See table 1.2 below.
  • Living in deprived neighbourhoods where Adult Learning is currently relatively underrepresented.

You can use this link to view the 20% most deprived SOAs on a mapping tool and gain further insight into areas and types of deprivation in Leeds.


Appendix 2: Leeds City Council Adult Learning Plan 2016 – 2020/21

What we will do

Mission

'“To widen participation in lifelong learning and promote social inclusion in Leeds .Giving Leeds citizens the skills and confidence to make progress in their lives including into employment.”

Overall Objectives

Widen participation in learning to meet the needs of learners from the most deprived neighbourhoods and facing multiple barriers and disadvantage.

Enhance individuals’ life opportunities by providing a wide range of learning.

Provide high quality teaching, learning and assessment to enable learners to achieve their learning aims and make positive progression.

Build organisational capability and infrastructure to deliver new and innovative learning Maintain financial stability through transparent procurement, commissioning and curriculum planning.

Maximise the public pound and achieve added value.

Who we will target

Priority Learner Groups

  • Not in employment and/or in receipt of benefit
  • With low-skill levels, with few or no qualifications
  • Lone parents
  • Older people
  • Care leavers
  • Black, Asian and ethnic minority groups BME
  • Adults with learning difficulties and/or disabilities including people with mild to moderate mental health issues
  • Those who are digitally excluded
  • Those for whom English is a second or other language
  • Those with English and Maths skills below Level 2

How we will do it

  • English, Maths and English as a Second or Other Language (ESOL)
  • Vocational Skills includes the development of work skills such as childcare, customer service and retail.
  • Personal and Social Development – includes the development of interview skills, attitude to work, improving confidence and personal effectiveness.
  • Digital Skills – helps learners use technology more effectively
  • Enterprise – helps participants find out about self-employment with support in starting your own business.
  • Family English, Maths and Language (FEML) – helps parents and carers to support children in English and Maths from early years and develop their own skills.
  • Financial Skills – helps learners to understand and manage their own finances more effectively.
  • Health and Wellbeing – includes improved mental or physical wellbeing; healthy eating courses that aim to help learners with healthier lifestyles.
  • Learners with Learning Difficulties and Disabilities (LLDD) – specialist provision specifically for residents needing more support to access learning and includes development of independence to help learners progress at home and in life.
  • Wider Family Learning – complements the work carried out under FEML and helps parents / carers to support their children’s learning through a wide range of courses.

How we will know if we have made a difference

Outcomes

  • Improved numbers of Leeds residents engaged in learning
  • Increase in numbers of learners accessing employment opportunities and training (progression)
  • Improved digital, financial and communication skills Parents and carers better equipped to encourage and support their children’s learning (Family Learning)
  • Enhanced health and social wellbeing (social value)
  • Increased volunteering and involvement in the community (social value)
  • Ofsted Rating of ‘Outstanding’ or ‘Good’


Appendix 3: Learner Fees Policy – PCDL, FEML, WFL, SfLW

Delivery must meet funding rules set out in Adult Education Budget: Funding Rules. Draft rules for 20/21 have been published by the ESFA but most up to date rules must be followed at the time of delivery.

All Adult Learning providers must adhere to the Learner Fees Policy.

Learners will be charged a fee for the learning they receive. There are three fee rates:

  1. Full Fee
  2. Reduced Fee
  3. Fee Exempt

1. Full Fee

  • £3.00 per guided learning hour (glh)

This applies to:

  • Employed learners who are not eligible for a reduced fee or fee exemption.
  • Economically inactive learners who are not eligible for a reduced fee or fee exemption.

2. Reduced Fee

  • £0.80p per guided learning hour (glh)

This applies to learners who are in receipt of a State Pension and are not eligible for a fee exemption. 65+yrs for men and women.

3. Fee Exempt

  • No charge

3a. Fee exemptions due to course

Learners attending the following courses are fee exempt:

  • Courses specifically for learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities (LLDD).
    o The Course Proposal must state that the course is LLDD and the course must be only eligible to learners who have a learning difficulty and/or disability.
    o Please note, adults with a learning difficulty and/or disability who enrol on a non-LDD course should pay the Full Fee rate unless they fall into the Reduced Fee category or are eligible for fee exemption under another criteria.
  • Courses where the main learning aim is English, ESOL or Maths.
  • Family English, Maths and Language courses.
  • Wider Family Learning courses.

3b. Fee exemptions due to learner being in receipt of benefit

Learners in receipt of the following income based state benefits are Fee Exempt:

  • Active Benefits:
    o Universal Credit
    o Job Seekers Allowance (JSA)
    o Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) in the Work Related Activity Group
  • Other income related state benefits:
    o Employment and Support Allowance (non-WRAG)
    o Income Support
    o Housing Benefit
    o Council Tax Benefit (low income households)
    o Working Tax credit
    o Pension Credit (not savings credit)
    o Carers Allowance
    o Personal Independence Payments

3c. Fee exemptions due to learner falling into one of the following categories

Learners who fall into one of the following categories are fee exempt:

  • An offender serving their sentence in the community.
  • An Asylum Seeker in receipt of the equivalent of an income based state benefit.
  • The unwaged dependant of an Asylum Seeker.
  • An individual who is economically inactive because they are unable to claim income related state benefits.
  • An individual who earns less than £17004.00 annual gross salary.
  • An individual suffering hardship – where a learner is required to pay either the full or reduced fees and the provider considers that an individual is unable to contribute towards the cost of their learning on the grounds of hardship, the provider should apply to Leeds City Council for fee exemption for the learner using the “Application for Learner Fee Discretionary Exemption Form: Hardship”.

On considering an application for hardship, providers must satisfy themselves of the learner’s inability to contribute to learning by reviewing appropriate financial evidence of learner income and be approved by LCC before the learner enrols and any fee exemption only applies after the application approval date.

3d. Fee exemption evidence

To be eligible for fee exemption learners must provide appropriate written evidence.

Providers are required to check and keep any evidence as required by ESFA / AEB funding guidance.

  • Learner evidence which is inappropriate will result in the learner being charged a Full Fee rate. If the learner is no longer on the course the provider will be required to cover the cost of the full fee rate.
  • Leeds City Council can advise on the appropriateness of evidence.

3.1 Learner Enrolment Time – Impact on Fee rate A.

  • Learners enrolling up to and including the third week of a course – the learner fee amount should be for the full length of the course.
  • Learners enrolling on the fourth or subsequent week of a course – the learner fee amount should be pro-rata to reflect the number of course hours remaining.
  • Once a learner has enrolled and attended more than 2 weeks full fee assumed – exceptions below.

Learner Fee Refunds

The provider should obtain the learner’s fees prior to the learner starting their course. Fees should be refunded in the following circumstances:

  • The course fails to form or closes in the third week or earlier – the provider should return the full fee payment to the learner.
  • The course closes in the fourth session or subsequent sessions – the provider should refund the learner a pro-rata amount, taking in to account the course hours remaining and the fee amount paid.
  • The learner withdraws from a course as a result of circumstances beyond their control that could not have been foreseen at the time of enrolment – the fee refund should be calculated according to the guidance given in A and B above. The refund may be subject to the deduction of an administration charge.
  • The learner withdraws from the course out of personal preference – no refund.

Additional Learner Charges

  • Providers are required to adhere to the hourly fee rates set out above and should not impose any additional surcharges to meet the general cost of providing courses.
  • Practical courses which require specialist course materials/resources - providers have the discretion to charge learners a reasonable amount for specialist course materials in practical courses.

Learner Fee Collection

  • Providers are responsible for collecting fees from all eligible learners.
  • Fee information should be accurately identified on the Course Proposal Form and the ILR Template.
  • The ILR will be used to calculate fees owed to the Council.
  • At the end of the academic year Leeds City Council will invoice providers for the Learner Fees amount.
  • Leeds City Council will use the learner fees monies to support ongoing delivery of subsequent Adult Learning provision.

Recording Learner Fee Payments

  • A provider must record details of all payments (course fees and other charges) made by the learner to the provider relating to Adult Learning provision.
  • A provider must issue a receipt to the learner for all payments made by the learner.
  • Providers must retain an audit trail for fees received and should make any fees documentation available for audit as required.


Appendix 3a: Learner Fees Policy Adult Skills (ASB)

All learners will be fully funded or co-funded as defined by the ESFA in the Adult Learning Funding Rules 2020/21 with extracts of key guidance below.


Provision19-23 year-olds24+ Unemployed24+ Other
English and maths, up to and including level 2
(Must be delivered as part of the legal entitlement)

Fully funded*Fully funded*Fully funded*
Level 2 (excluding English and maths)
(First full level 2 must be delivered as part of the legal entitlement)

Fully funded* (first and full)Fully fundedCo-funded+
Learning to progress to level 2Fully funded^ (upto and including level 1)Fully fundedCo-funded+
Level 3
(First full level 3 must be delivered as part of the legal entitlement)

Fully funded* (first and full)
Loan funded** (previously achieved full level 3 or above)
Loan-fundedLoan-funded
Traineeship#Fully funded (including 16-24 year-olds**)n/an/a
English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) learning up to and including level 2Co-funded+
Fully funded - unemployed
Fully fundedCo-funded+
Learning aims up to and including level 2, where the learner has already achieved a first full level 2, or aboveCo-funded+
Fully funded - unemployed
Fully fundedCo-funded+
Learning aims up to and including level 2, where the learner has not achieved a first full level 2, or aboven/aFully fundedCo-funded+

*Must be delivered as one of the English and maths, and/or first full level 2 or first full level 3 qualifications required as part of the legal entitlements.

^Must be delivered as entry or level one provision from local flexibility.

# Excludes flexible element where funding depends on age and level.

## 16- to 18-year-old learners must be eligible under the ESFA's young people's residency requirements.

** Availability of loans at level 3 does not replace the legal entitlement to full funding for learners aged 19 to 23 undertaking their first full level 3.

+ Low wage flexibility may apply.

Unemployed

157. For funding purposes, we define a learner as unemployed if one or more of the following apply, they:

157.1. receive Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA), including those receiving National Insurance credits only

157.2. receive Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

157.3. receive Universal Credit, and their take-home pay as recorded on their Universal Credit statement (disregarding benefits) is less than £338 a month (learner is sole adult in their benefit claim) or £541 a month (learner has a joint benefit claim with their partner)

157.4. are released on temporary licence, studying outside a prison environment, and not funded by the Ministry of Justice

158. Providers may also use their discretion to fully fund other learners if both of the following apply. The learner:

158.1. receives other state benefits (not listed in paragraph 157) and their take home pay (disregarding benefits) is less than £338 a month (learner is sole adult in their benefit claim) or £541 a month (learner has a joint benefit claim with their partner), and

158.2. wants to be employed, or progress into more sustainable employment, and their take-home pay (disregarding benefits) is less than £338 a month (learner is sole adult in their benefit claim) or £541 a month (learner has a joint benefit claim with their partner), and you are satisfied identified learning is directly relevant to their employment prospects and the local labour market needs

Fully funded learners are not charged a fee.

Co-funded learners will be charged a fee for the learning they receive. The provider may determine the level of fee to be charged but can be no more than 50% of the unweighted rate as shown on the LARS and a minimum of £3 per hour.

3. Evidencing Full Funding

  • To be eligible for full funding learners must provide appropriate written evidence.
  • Learner evidence which is inappropriate will result in the learner being charged a full fee rate. If the learner is no longer on the course the provider will be required to cover the cost of the full fee rate.
  • Leeds City Council can advise on the appropriateness of evidence.

4. Learners in receipt of low wage

159. You may fully fund learners who are employed, or self-employed, and would normally be co-funded for provision, up to and including level 2. You must be satisfied the learner is both:

159.1. eligible for co-funding, and

159.2. earns less than £17,004.00 annual gross salary

160. You must have seen evidence of the learner’s gross annual wages in these circumstances. This could be a wage slip or a Universal Credit statement within 3 months of the learner’s learning start date, or a current employment contract which states gross monthly/annual wages. Please note this is not an exhaustive list, but you must evidence your decision to award full funding to an individual who would normally be eligible for co-funding.

Providers are required to check and keep any evidence as required by ESFA / AEB funding guidance for 2020/21.

5. Learner Fee Refunds

The provider should obtain the learner’s fees prior to the learner starting their course.

Fees should be refunded in the following circumstances:

  • The course fails to form or closes in the third week or earlier – the provider should return the full fee payment to the learner.
  • The course closes in the fourth session or subsequent sessions – the provider should refund the learner on a pro-rata amount, taking in to account the course hours remaining and the fee amount paid.
  • The learner withdraws from a course as a result of circumstances beyond their control that could not have been foreseen at the time of enrolment – the fee refund should be calculated according to the guidance given in 1 and 2. The refund may be subject to the deduction of an administration charge.
  • The learner withdraws from the course out of personal preference – no refund.

6. Learner Fee Collection

  • Providers are responsible for collecting fees from all eligible learners.
  • Fee information should be accurately identified on the Course Proposal Form and the ILR Template.

7. Recording Learner Fee Payments

  • A provider must record details of all payments (course fees and other charges) made by the learner to the provider relating to Adult Learning provision.
  • A provider must issue a receipt to the learner for all payments made by the learner
  • Providers must retain an audit trail for fees received and should make any fees documentation available for audit as required.


Appendix 4: Tariff Rates - Overview

1. Guided Learning Tariff

On all programmes except accredited programmes, Leeds City Council will pay providers a defined rate for every hour of guided learning delivered.


ProgrammeGuided Learning Tariff (GLH) Targets Not Met (see note 1)Guided Learning Tariff (GLH) Targets Met (see note 2)Development Hours/one-to-one supportSpecialist Staff TrainingNotes
PCDL, FEML, WFL and SfLW£55 per GLH£70 per GLHGuided learning must be delivered to a minimum of ten learners and the learners must be on a course which has a minimum of six hours of guided learning for PCDL or two hours for taster courses and ten for all other courses.(nb separate guidance for ESOL)
Targeted Learning Project£55 per GLH£70 per GLH£25 per hourMax £500Guided learning must be delivered to a minimum of ten learners and the learners must be on a course which has a minimum of six hours of guided learning.

Providers will need to stipulate how they plan to use the one to one/ development hours.

Funding is available to support attending Mental Health awareness training.

Targeted Learning Project Overnight Residential£185 per GLH£185 per GLHn/an/aFunding for targeted learning overnight residential courses are for a minimum of ten learners for a minimum of ten hours up to a maximum of sixteen hours in total.
Accredited Adult Skills Budget£0 (see note 4)£0 (see note 3)Accredited Adult Skills Budget courses will be paid per learner according to the weighting criteria and rates defined in LARS. Leeds City Council does not impose a specific minimum number of learners for each course; it is the responsibility of each provider to ensure the economic feasibility of each course and meet their target learner numbers.
Digital Curriculum Pilot/development£55 per GLH£70 per GLHSee notesSee notes
  • Agreed module development time at a rate of £15 per hour, supported by documentary evidence (timesheets, materials produced etc.)
  • Mandatory tutor attendance at scheduled review meetings paid at £25.00 per meeting
  • Tutor CPD to be agreed based on tutor skills analysis, development need and intervention required

Notes:

Note 1 - £55 per glh for providers who do not support the number of learners specified in their contract by the end of each course / paid termly

Note 2 - £70 per glh for providers who support the number of learners specified in their contract by the end of the each course / paid termly

All courses will be expected to have a minimum of eight learners attending each week with ten on the register unless otherwise agreed in advance with LCC in writing. Where attendance falls below eight for three consecutive weeks LCC should be informed in writing to confirm arrangements to allow class to continue.

Classes that fall below these minimum standards will be paid at the lower rate.

Note 3 - Accredited Adult Skills Budget programme will be paid per learner according to the rates defined in Learning Aims Reference Service.

2. Non-Teaching Assistants / Learning Support Assistants

Leeds City Council recognises that a tutor may need non-teaching support to deliver a course, for instance where several learners on the course have a physical disability or a learning difficulty.

Leeds City Council will pay £11.00 per glh towards the cost of employing a Non-Teaching Assistant (NTA) / Learning Support Assistant (LSA). We expect all providers to be Living Wage employers and where two tenders are otherwise the same this will be used a differentiation in scoring.

Where the NTA/LSA is a volunteer, Leeds City Council will pay £3.00 per glh to cover the volunteer’s incidental costs.

All NTA/LSA costs should be pre-approved by Leeds City Council prior to the course starting through the course approval process on Maytas.

The provider should follow safer recruitment practices and ensure that all NTAs/LSAs (including volunteers):

  • Receive an appropriate induction and training to successfully undertake their roles and responsibilities.
  • Are appropriately qualified.
  • Complete an application form or submit an up to date CV
  • Provide details of appropriate referees that are checked prior to appointment
  • Have a current DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service) certificate

3. Crèche

Leeds City Council is committed to removing the barriers facing individuals wanting to participate in Adult Learning. A key barrier is childcare. Providers can apply for funding to support the cost of childcare for a learner while that learner is undertaking their learning activity.

On all programmes except Accredited Learning, Leeds City Council will pay £35 per glh towards the cost of running a crèche. This rate will cover the cost of one qualified and one unqualified crèche worker. Where additional workers are required due to the ages or number of children, an additional £11.00 per glh may be claimed. Crèche must have a minimum of 3 children regularly attending.

Alternatively, where providers prefer to infill into an existing crèche, Leeds City Council will pay £5.00 per glh for each child per session up to a maximum of £35 per glh.

All crèche funding must be pre-approved by Leeds City Council through the Course Proposal Form prior to the course starting.

4. Additional Learning Support Fund

Leeds City Council recognises that a learner may need specific personal support to enable them to fully participate in a course, e.g. the learner may be deaf and require a signer.

Where a personal support need is identified the provider should apply for funding using the Personal Learner Support Fund Form. The application should be made before the learner starts their course and funding is dependent on Leeds City Council approving the application. Leeds City Council will only fund expenditure generated after the application approval date.

A separate application should be made for each learner requiring personal learning support funding. A learner can only be funded through the Additional Learning Support Fund once per course.

Additional Learning Support funding calculation:

Leeds City Council, the provider and the learner will contribute toward the cost of supplying the personal learning support.

  • Provider contribution = £8.50 per glh
  • Learner contribution = glh rate equivalent to their Learner Fee rate, e.g. £3.00/£0.80 (see Appendix 3 for Learner Fee policy). Where the learner does not pay a fee the provider will cover this element of the cost
  • Leeds City Council will pay the balance of the cost of the personal support

Please note: Providers should retain appropriate and valid evidence of all expenditure relating to any funded activity for payment and audit purposes. Failure to retain appropriate and valid evidence may result in funding being withheld or reclaimed.


Appendix 5: Family English, Maths and Language - Delivery Criteria

All Family English, Maths and Language courses with the exception of Keeping up with the Children should ideally involve intergenerational activities and involve mothers and/or fathers working on their own and include joint activities with their child/children.

All courses should include agreed assessment of Maths and English skills levels and challenge and encourage learners to develop their English, language and/or maths skills. Programmes should include a range of ‘home time’ activities and demonstrate clearly how effective family engagement with a child’s education can have a significant impact.

Examples of courses that will be funded include:

  • Introductory (up to 14 hours)
    o Keeping up with the Children – To inform parents of how children are being taught English and Maths in schools.
    o Play and Language - To encourage parents to talk and play with their babies and toddlers and learn about the importance of play in early language development.

  • Short (up to 30 hours)
    o Let’s Start Learning Together - To introduce parents to the ways their children learn through play and the use of listening and talking skills for playing and thinking.o Let’s Get Crafty - To enable parents to encourage and support their children’s development through a range of craft activities.
    o Playing with Language - To improve both parents and children’s English and word power using stories, rhymes and songs.
    o Story Sacks - To improve English or Maths for parents and children and support children’s developing Language or Maths skills through story reading and storytelling.
    o Family Health – To improve English, Maths or language skills and include activities which enable parents to make healthy choices such as healthy eating, exercise and positive mental health and wellbeing.
    o Fun with Games (English/Maths) - To improve Maths/English through use of a wide variety of games
  • Standard (up to 72 hours)
    o Family English - To help improve English for both parents and children and to extend parents skills in supporting their child’s/children’s developing English.
    o Family Maths - To improve Maths skills for both parents and children and to extend parents skills in supporting their child’s/children’s Maths.
    o Family English (ESOL) - To improve the English skills of parents whose first language is not English and to enable them to support their children’s learning.


Appendix 6: English as a Second Language Framework

Any provider that plans to deliver ESOL must deliver modules under the ESOL Framework, which are all mapped to the ESOL core curriculum. Modules available will be listed in the Provider Handbook. Any exceptions must be agreed at the contract stage.

Each module is designed to be delivered between 30-36 guided learning hours. This includes up to 2 hours for initial assessment per course. The modules are stand alone, however, learners will be able to take up to four modules in a year (120glh) to enable them to progress from one level to the next in at least one language skill area.

Each module includes set objectives which are the minimum that must be delivered. The objectives are written for four different levels, from Pre-entry up to Entry 3, to enable teachers to use them with mixed ability groups.

Each module includes mandatory outcomes relating to personal information, becoming independent learners, British values and basic numeracy. The mandatory outcomes provide underpinning skills and will be assessed throughout the course.

The overall aim of the modules is to improve confidence and develop language skills in key areas that support integration in everyday life. Sample modules are listed below and final list will be in Provider Handbook.

  • Me and My Health and Wellbeing - topics covered include: talking about health problems to a doctor or nurse; accessing local health services; personal safety.
  • Me and My Money - topics covered include: shopping; paying bills; banking; budgeting.
  • Me and Where I Live - topics covered include: housing; using transport; how to find places e.g. Job Centre.
  • Me and My Future - topics covered include: registering for further education classes or for work; preparing for interviews; creating a CV; information, advice and guidance on progression; language development opportunities.
  • Reading for Everyday Life - topics covered include; reading public signs, notices and symbols; reading letters and emails; reading instructions and short reports. Learners will also learn how to decode words and scan for gist.
  • Writing for Everyday Life - topics covered include: handwriting, spelling and punctuation; writing notes, letters and emails; filling in forms; writing short/simple narratives; making written records from oral dictation.
  • Social Conversation - topics covered include: making small talk; asking for things; giving opinions; agreeing and disagreeing; giving advice; responding to personal questions; expressing feelings and needs.


Appendix 7: Maintaining Course Records

Introduction

All providers are expected to use LCC management information (Maytas) system for maintaining course records and keep them up to date. Training and support are available to allow staff to make best use of the system.

Course Records

Courses must be set up on Maytas prior to delivery; see dates set out in the Provider Handbook 2020/21. This is a minimum and the expectation is that courses will be entered well in advance of starting to allow LCC staff to monitor planned and actual performance against allocations and targets. Providers will be informed by email if any changes are required to allow suitable time to make any necessary modifications.

Individual Learner Records

Learner records will be entered onto Maytas in advance of, or at the latest two weeks after, starting the course. All courses should start with a minimum of ten enrolments unless given written permission to start with fewer. All errors identified in validation reports or by warning message in Maytas need to be corrected promptly.

Etrack

All providers must record learner attendance using Etrack system and this should be kept up to date (ideally weekly) throughout the course so both LCC and provider can monitor attendance and check where any courses have fallen below minimum attendance of eight for three consecutive weeks. Where minimum attendance levels are not maintained the provider must communicate with LCC to gain permission to continue the course.


Appendix 8: Leeds 2018-23 Children and Young People’s Plan

Helping deliver the Best Council Plan and our Best City Ambition of a strong economy in a compassionate city.

What we'll do

One vision

Our vision is for Leeds to be the best city in the UK and the best city for children and young people to grow up in. We want Leeds to be a child friendly city.

Through our vision and obsessions, we invest in children and young people to help build an increasingly prosperous and successful city. We aim to improve outcomes for all our children whilst recognising the need for outcomes to improve faster for children and young people from vulnerable and deprived backgrounds.

Three obsessions

  1. Safely and appropriately reduce the number of children looked after
  2. reduce the number of young people not in education, employment and training (NEET)
  3. Improve achievement, attainment and attendance at school

Five outcomes

Conditions of wellbeing we want for all our children and young people. All children and young people:

  1. are safe from harm
  2. do well at all levels of learning and have skills for life
  3. enjoy healthy lifestyles
  4. have fun growing up
  5. are active citizens who feel they have a voice and influence

Eleven priorities

  1. Help children and parents to live in safe, supportive and loving families
  2. Ensure that the most vulnerable are protected
  3. Support families to give children the best start in life
  4. Increase the number of children and young people participating and engaging in learning
  5. Improve achievement and attainment for all
  6. Improve at a faster rate educational progress for children and young people vulnerable to poor learning outcomes
  7. Improve social, emotional and mental health and wellbeing
  8. Encourage physical activity and healthy eating
  9. Support young people to make good choices and minimise
  10. Help young people into adulthood, to develop life skills, and be ready for work
  11. Improve access to affordable, safe and reliable connected transport for young people

How we'll do it

The best start in life for all children

Before and after birth, we will support parents and babies to create the conditions where stress is reduced, positive bonds and attachments can form and language and communication skills develop.

Attaining and achieving

Learning underpins wellbeing; we will place a disproportionate focus on learning, and readiness for learning, so we narrow the gap, and enable all children and young people - particularly those who are vulnerable learners - to realise their potential.

Think family, work family

When working with a child or young person, we will consider their family relationships, the role of adult behaviour, and the wider context such as their friends and the local community, and how these impact on outcomes for children and young people.

Challenging child poverty

In acknowledging the scale and impact of poverty on families, we will work with communities and families to mitigate the impact of poverty on children's outcomes and support children's journeys into secure adulthood in a prosperous city.

Early help - the right conversations in the right place at the right time

Building on what works well, and reorganising more of our services around the Restorative Early Start (RES) approach, we will focus help to where it is needed earlier.

Outstanding social work and support for vulnerable children and young people

Continuing our journey to outstanding following the 2015 Ofsted inspection, our Families First programme, and our investment in social work (e.g. the RES teams), we will ensure consistent quality across all our work with vulnerable children and young people.

A stronger offer to improve SEMH and well-being

We will redesign the whole system of SEMH and wellbeing support, and create simple pathways with clear points of entry to an integrated offer from education, health, and social care services, which is personalised to individual needs.

How we'll know if we've made a difference

  1. Number of children looked after
  2. Number of children and young people subject to a child protection plan
  3. Number of parents experiencing a second or subsequent instance of having a children or children enter care
  4. Number of children and young people with a 'Child in Need Plan'
  5. Percentage of pupils achieving a good level of development at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage
  6. Infant mortality rates
  7. Percentage of new school places in good and outstanding schools
  8. Attendance at primary and secondary schools
  9. Number of fixed-term exclusions from primary and secondary schools
  10. Percentage of pupils reaching the expected standard in reading, writing, and maths at the end of Key Stage 2.
  11. Progress 8 score for Leeds at the end of Key Stage 4.
  12. Destinations of young people with special educational needs and/or a disability when they leave school
  13. Progress against measures in the Future in Mind dashboard
  14. Prevalence of children at age 11 who are a healthy weight
  15. Proportion of young offenders who re-offend
  16. Under-18 conception rates
  17. Admission episodes for alcohol-specific conditions: under-18s
  18. Percentage of students achieving a level 3 qualification at age 19
  19. Number of young people indicator to be developed after further discussions with young people
  20. Transport for young people indicator to be developed after further discussions with young people

Behaviours that underpin everything we do

  • Use outcome-based accountability and ask the question 'Is anyone better off?'
  • Use restorative practice to work and do with people, not for or to them
  • We listen and respond to the voice of the child
  • We support and prioritise children and young people to have fun growing up